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MIT Physics Demo -- Dipole Antenna

An RF transmitter is connected to a long antenna, emitting radio waves. A dipole antenna with a light bulb between its elements acts as the receiver. When the receiving antenna is parallel to the transmitter, the radio waves are absorbed, creating a current in the antenna and causing the bulb to glow. When perpendicular, no current is created, and the bulb does not glow.

Comments (3)

Do you know where one can find that RF transmitter? We're looking to get one for ourselves.

Posted almost 6 years by Anonymous User

would you send me the circuits that you use?

Posted almost 5 years by nahuelv

How can i make such an receiving antenna?
please send me the circuit…

Posted over 3 years by sagar

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Created
June 06, 2008 11:36
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